Sunday, September 21, 2014

Monarchs on the Butterfly Bush

I was much encouraged to see my first Monarch butterfly in two years on the last day of summer, but over the next two weeks it stayed around, and at least one more arrived.  They particularly liked our Butterfly Bush, the Buddleia.  I was very glad to get a few more pictures, and hope that next year we have even more.

It simply kept fluttering from blossom to blossom, and I was able to get several good pictures like this one.

But it didn't want to sit with its wings open much, so this was my vest shot showing the deep orange of the upper wings.

And at least for a while there were two Monarchs fluttering around, but they would not pose nicely together.  This was the best I could do to prove there were two!

The plight of the Monarchs leaves me with a lot more questions than answers, but I was very glad to see these ones at least before summer ended.

Meanwhile, an early first frosty that killed off the tender squash leaves two nights ago means that fall has definitely arrived, just as the calendar suggests.

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21 comments:

  1. Not the squash! Though the calender will say fall shortly, frost is rare before mid November in the area I live. Have a wonderful week.

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  2. I've seen monarchs this summer, but mostly in the latter half of the season.

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  3. Lovely monarch shots. Where I used to live we would have lots of monarchs come through on their way south-it was wonderful. Now I rarely see them but do see a small yellow butterfly often.

    Sorry about your squash!

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  4. Beautiful photos of the monarchs! It's so nice to see them even this late in the season.

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  5. Those are beautiful shots, but i am so sorry for the squash, they are still in their prime!

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  6. I hope you got a worthwhile squash crop before the end. Mine have really slowed down and are not producing much anymore. Mildew is a problem too. The Monarchs are so pretty, I'm really enamoured of the black trim with white spots as a design element on the wings, body and even head. Monarchs are not really known where I live but someone reported a caterpillar on their milkweed 20 miles away, so perhaps there is hope. I'm actually trying to grow milkweed for them but rabbits nibbled it to the ground.

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  7. Gorgeous butterflies. We might get the first cold nights this week as well.

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  8. Beautiful photos of the monarchs! I like it!
    Have a nice week!
    Hugs Riv

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  9. Those leaves are wilted beyond repair, and superb Monarch shots, the colour is spot on. lovely series. Stay warm, Cheers,Jean

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  10. I like the colors! And the pictures Arena so clear and detailed.

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  11. What a pity about your squash. If you get out early enough, before the sun gets to the plants, and melt wthe frost by spraying water on them, the damage can be avoided. I do that with my early spring flowers and seedlings.
    Lovely monarchs. They also love dahlias and abelias, I usually have them in profusion on both.

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    1. Our squash were mostly a failure this year anyway, and we'd have to keep them growing for weeks yet to get anything. Impossible in this climate.

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  12. How sad that frost has hit your garden! I've seen a few more monarchs this year than last but the numbers are still down, I fear.

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  13. Lucky you, to have Monarchs visiting! Too bad with the frost. I hope to avoid it for a while.

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  14. Hello Furry Gnome, I am so glad the Monarchs visited your garden. I planted milkweed last year and 3 came this year to lay eggs. So far I have seen 4 juvenile Monarchs. They came out, ate for about half a day, and flew away. You might be interested in reading my post this week http://cedarmerefarm.blogspot.com/2014/09/they-are-here.html Christa

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