Thursday, November 8, 2018

Start with the Roof!

If you've read this blog for awhile, you will remember that the builder here builds from the roof down.  He builds the roof first, sitting directly on the foundation.  He then brings in a huge crane and lifts the roof aside.  And a week later lifts it back onto the walls.  He argues that its both safer and cheaper.

There are three foundations already in place which he is hoping to finish over the winter.  Here's the roof, almost completed, sitting on the first foundation.

I came by a few days later to find they had brought in the crane and lifted the roof off, setting it aside for now.

They were securing the crane ready to head back to Owen sound.

I'm always intrigued with the mechanics of this enormous crane.  It extends 150 feet into the air in 4 huge sections.

Left behind is the foundation, ready for the walls to be built.  They're doing that now.

Just to remind you, here's part of our neighbout's house being lifted into place last year.

22 comments:

  1. That really is quite a process, but he obviously knows what he's doing.

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  2. Hope you get to see the entire sequence - I haven't seen a build roof first/set it aside etc before.
    Joy

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  3. Wow, what a wonderful machine, and that crane, every little boy's dream to see it working. Hope all is well with you both, fondest wishes to you and Mrs F.G.

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  4. Building a roof on the ground seemed weird until I looked at your first photo and saw right away the logical safety factor involved. Instead of falling 30, 40, or 50 feet off the edge of the roof to the ground one only falls about 1 foot. Hardly even worth putting a hard hat on.

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  5. It looks like these pieces are put together in a plant and then brought out and put together.

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  6. Wow! It's such a fantastic thing to see. I never heard of it before I found you. Looking forward to seeing more of the process. :-)

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  7. Wow---I've never heard of this..... SO interesting.... I'd love to be there to watch it all come together...

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  8. Still intriguing after seeing your earlier posts -- while I understand the safety aspect (although cranes have their own safety issues) it's hard to believe that it's less expensive given the hourly cost of that size crane (not to mention the cost of mobilizing and demobilizing the machine at least twice).

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  9. That's unusual but I guess it protects the building materials from weather.

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  10. It is an interesting way to build a house:)

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  11. Certainly much safer building the roof on the ground, makes good sense to me. I remember you pictures from the previous posting.

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  12. Hello! I haven't visited in months but saw this post and remember you sharing this construction idea before. I don't know as it's done here in NB but it kind of makes sense. I scrolled down through your fall posts and enjoyed all your photos of the fall colours and your local tours. I was very happy to see you are now home and able to get out and enjoy life from a different vantage point and perspective. I wish you well! I haven't blogged for a couple of months as I don't have the time but am on Instagram and share some pics there. Take care and I wish you and your wife a (fast approaching) blessed Christmas season. Pam

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  13. Stunning construction process. I bet you are more than excited.

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  14. Wow, that is so cool! It makes total sense too!

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  15. Quite a different and interesting process to building houses , Our neighbors had their house build in a factory called Modular homes and brought to the land in two halves and put together . These days seems the old fashioned way of building from the ground up is becoming a thing of the past . Lovely photos . Thanks for sharing . Have a good weekend.

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  16. I'll agree with the safer part. All that equipment looks expensive though. Interesting that winter construction is a good time. - Margy

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  17. Yes, I remember that. It is the one and only time I've heard of that. Pretty neat idea. Pretty hard if you don't have a crane though. : )

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  18. If the builder likes doing it that way, it is the best way for him. Interesting approach.

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  19. Really a beautiful blog.It is very astonishing and marvelous design.

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  20. It truly is a great way to build them. I have never seen them before except on your blog. I wonder if the lift a roof to a second story height.

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