Friday, August 9, 2013

Georgian Bay

At the north end of its watershed, the Beaver River flows straight into Georgian Bay, so the shoreline marks the end of the Beaver Valley.  We headed there a week ago now to search for fossils with the kids and grandson.  (We found lots, but that's another story).  Not only was the water at its most brilliant blue, but the sky was pretty spectacular that day as well.

This part of the bay shoreline is east of the main Beaver Valley, at Craigleith, where flat shelving limestone rock dips very gently into the bay.  Water levels have been low this year, leading many to complain about their docks being stranded high and dry, and leaving a wide beach to walk on.

Looking west you can see the slopes that mark the west side of the Beaver Valley, ending in the clay banks east of Meaford.  The main highway follows the shoreline fairly closely.

Stone groins are common along the shore, though this year most are partly above the water line.  This day the strong north wind was blowing the waves onshore, and washing a thin layer of water over the rocks - just enough for a grandchild to get wet in!  All the multi-coloured boulders you see here are glacial erratics, brought here from the Canadian Shield during the last ice age.

You look straight out into the bay over the flat limestone, and here is where the fossils are found, some in flakes of stone that have broken off, and some still embedded in the solid bedrock beneath your feet.  Another time I'll share some fossil pictures.

And of course the are the ubiquitous gulls, always a feature of the Great Lakes.  Their raucous cries immediately bring to mind the harbours of towns around the bay.

With the spectacular sky on this day, of course I'm linking to:

29 comments:

  1. A beautiful post Oh hairy one. Thank you for following my humble blog. It is particularly pleasing to have a Canadian follower as my husband got his Phd. from McGill and we lived in Montreal for a few years. Canadian seasons are locked deep in my heart and living on a farm now, we live by the seasons and the weather.
    I look forward to your fossil post. Somewhere among my 926 post, there is also a fossil post from the Warrumbungles in Queensland.
    Cheers . . . Arija

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    1. Well I've never been called that before! The sketch is actually 20 years old, but I like it. I'm much more dignified now, with much less hair!

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  2. Such beauty, sea and sky alike.
    I so miss the sea, Tennessee is a land-locked state, although we have many lakes and rivers, but nothing like a fresh sea-spray hitting ones's face :)
    Look forward to many more visits.
    ~Jo

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    1. Enjoy your blog too. We were thru Tennessee this spring on a trip to the Smokies. Beautiful countryside. Where do you live?

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  3. Replies
    1. Thanks, it's hard to beat Georgian Bay on a sunny day with the waves rolling in.

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  4. Thanks that you visit our blog,
    Have a nice weekend, RW & SK

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  5. What fabulous pictures, sky and water. I am so impressed. :-)

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    1. Not quite the mountains of out west, but it's the best we've got!

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  6. I love looking at this spot when we pass on our way to Barrie, often to see people fishing off the shore.

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    1. Hi, hope you're having a great trip! Saw a 'Crabby Cab' in Owen Sound today.

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  7. Wow what wonderful photos. Each one better than the last.

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  8. Now that really does look like a beach that calls out for explorers! My kids would love the fossils.

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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  9. Hi There, I'm back after a big birthday week. Trying to catch up a little on my blogging.

    Great photos of the Georgian Bay... Love the sky also in the photos... Neat!
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  10. It's been decades since I was anywhere to collect fossils. I found many nice ones in the great state of Texas. I'm looking forward to your photos. Your sea photos are fun, I haven't been to the beach for a year, though it's a couple of hours from me. Salt spray, ahhh.

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    1. Maybe I'll show the fossils tomorrow....

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    1. Thanks. I think you're my first visitor from Norway!

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  12. The term stone groin was new to me. I live and learn! I should take my grandchildren fossil hunting too.

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    1. The groins are supposed to help reduce shoreline rosin, but since the water level has fallen, they're not doing much.

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  13. WoW, what a beautiful place!! love those rocks!!

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